Tag Archives | J.H. Williams III

Cartoon Art Museum to host an evening with J.H. Williams III

Sandman Overture CoverThe Cartoon Art Museum, 655 Mission Street in San Francisco, will be hosting an evening with illustrator J.H. Williams III as part of the ongoing Sandman 25th Anniversary exhibition. Williams is illustrating the new Neil Gaiman authored Sandman miniseries and has contributed a number of unpublished pieces of work from the series to the museum. In a recent blog post Williams said the museum will be displaying more images for the March 15 event. The event starts at 7 p.m. and more details will be announced soon.

In other Cartoon Art Museum/Sandman news preorders are now being accepted for the exhibition catalog Grains of Sandman: 25 Years of Sandman. According to the museum’s website:

This 144-page full-color catalog showcases over 100 pieces from the museum exhibition, reproduced in full color to capture every detail of the original artwork.  Highlights include more than 20 pages from the groundbreaking first issue of Sandman; eight pages from “The Sound of Her Wings,” featuring the first appearance of Death from Sandman #8; full-color paintings by Yoshitaka Amano, Barron Storey, J.H. Williams III, and series cover artist Dave McKean; beautiful, unretouched pencil artwork by famed illustrator Michael Zulli; and highlights from Neil Gaiman‘s personal collection of Sandman artwork.

The catalog will come in various editions which are detailed here.

The Cartoon Art Museum teases Sandman 25th Anniversary exhibition

sandman issue1The Cartoon Art Museum will be saying “farewell” to Metropolis on September 29 and “hello” to The Dreaming on October 5. In conjunction with the 25th Anniversary of Sandman the museum will be featuring a Sandman exhibition running from October 5 until March 16. There’s currently very little information available regarding the exhibition beyond a small teaser on the museum’s website. Starting on October 30, Vertigo will be launching a new Sandman miniseries featuring the art of J.H.Williams III. The new series will tell the story of Dream before he was imprisoned by the Order of Ancient Mysteries in 1916.

The addition of Sandman to the exhibition roster makes it a big year for Sam Keith at the museum. From February until June the museum featured a retrospective for the artist best known for his groundbreaking series The Maxx. Keith, the artist on the first five issues of Sandman, has been credited (along with inker Mike Dringenberg) by series author Neil Gaiman as having one of the most important roles in the series by helping to create “the look.”

We’ll have more information on the exhibition as it becomes available.

DC’s editorial department back in spotlight as Batwoman’s creators step down

Batwoman proposal from issue 17.

Batwoman proposal from issue 17.

Last night J. H. Williams III and W. Haden Blackman announced that they’re leaving Batwoman after 26 issues due to editorial interference that included being “prohibited from ever showing Kate and Maggie actually getting married.” Williams followed up the posting of his letter on Twitter with the comment “But must clarify- was never put to us as being anti-gay marriage.”

No one except those who were in the editorial board room knows if this decision was based on a company policy against DC’s LGBT characters getting hitched. It would seem odd in light of the company’s increasing comfort with prominent LGBT characters including Batwoman, Midnighter, Apollo, Sarah Rainmaker, Alysia Yeoh, and Alan Scott. What we do know is that DC erased every major character marriage — most notably the marriage between Superman and Lois Lane — when they relaunched the DC Universe in 2011. That suggests DC may have a policy to limit the marriage of title characters — no matter their sexual orientation. DC has never declared that limiting marriages is a policy.

No matter the justification for denying the marriage, the departure of Blackman and Williams once again brings negative attention to DC’s editorial department, who seem to have an increasing problem of not trusting some creators while putting too much faith in others.

The story Williams and Blackman have been telling is unique in the DC Universe, as they’ve had the freedom to tell it in a bubble without needing to shape their arcs around pesky multiple-title event storylines. Batwoman and Batman, Inc. were the only Bat-books given the luxury to sit out both “The Court of Owls” and “Death of the Family.” The result, free of crossover interruptions, is a complete story that can be read straight through from the first issue. Its lead character is also one of the best developed characters in the new 52. Continue Reading →

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